STORIES FROM THE PEOPLE PROTECTING AND RECOVERING PUGET SOUND
Laura Blackmore, Puget Sound Partnership
Laura Blackmore, Executive Director, Puget Sound Partnership

 

Dear partners,

Our fourth issue of Making Waves focuses on the 2022-2026 Action Agenda, our community’s shared plan to advance Puget Sound recovery over the next four years. It is a bold plan, based on robust science and collaborative problem-solving, that includes strategies and actions to achieve long-term Puget Sound recovery.

This issue includes my conversation with Dennis McLerran, chair of the Puget Sound Partnership’s Leadership Council, about the Action Agenda, new funding for recovery, community involvement with the Action Agenda and its strategies, and our thoughts about the future of recovery in the region.

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Screenshot from the Action Agenda video, showing a shot of Puget Sound water. with text overlaid that says, "Puget Sound is a special place."
Q4 Issue 2022
kevin hyde

An introduction to the 2022-2026 Action Agenda

The 2022-2026 Action Agenda is our community’s shared plan to advance Puget Sound recovery over the next four years. With bold leadership and collaboration at all levels, coordinating our efforts, and acting urgently, Puget Sound can be a resilient ecosystem that supports healthy and diverse human communities and the habitats and species that we care about.

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Cover image for the 2022-2026 Action Agenda, which features a photo of Mount Rainier above the waters of Puget Sound, and an overlaid text banner that says, "2022-2026 Action Agenda for Puget Sound."
Q4 Issue 2022
kevin hyde

Making Waves Conversations: Laura Blackmore and Dennis McLerran discuss the 2022-2026 Action Agenda

This episode of Making Waves Conversations features an interview with Laura Blackmore, executive director of the Puget Sound Partnership, and Dennis McLerran, chair of the Puget Sound Partnership’s Leadership Council. In the interview, Laura and Dennis discuss what they find most exciting about the new Action Agenda and how it will help guide funding for recovery.

Read More »

Puget Sound Recovery Community Spotlight Stories

RESOURCES AND UPDATES FROM AROUND THE PUGET SOUND RECOVERY COMMUNITY

WASHINGTON INVASIVE SPECIES COUNCIL

Washington Invasive Species Council website

About invasive species

How Invasive Species Threaten Salmon

Aquatic invasive species of greatest concern

European Green Crab information

Report an invasive species sighting

WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Puget Sound Local Climate Change Needs Analysis Report

Building Green Cities

Critical areas adaptive management training workshops

Hazard Mitigation Integration Plan Resource Handbook

Puget Sound Mapping Project

WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

Reducing nutrients in Puget Sound

Ecology and Climate Change

Environmental Justice at Ecology

Ecology’s Blog

WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

In-season management for “mixed-stock” and “terminal area” salmon fisheries

Collaboration with ‘North America’s longest-running Pacific salmon derby’ expands research, understanding of central Puget Sound resident Chinook salmon

WDFW launches 10-year strategy for managing recreation on WDFW-managed lands

WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Washington Shellfish Safety Map

Shellfish Program

Environmental Justice

Climate and Health

WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

MyCoast App Helps Smart Phone Users Keep Puget Sound Clean

Introducing the Washington 100 — wa100.dnr.wa.gov

WASHINGTON STATE RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE

Southern Resident Orca Recovery

WASHINGTON STORMWATER CENTER

Tree research – using trees to manage stormwater

Measuring Individual Tree Water-use in Mature Native Species in the Pacific Northwest to Determine their Benefits for Stormwater Management

Measuring Individual Tree Water-use in Mature Native Species in the Pacific Northwest to Determine their Benefits for Stormwater

Salmon ecotoxicity

Urban Roadway Runoff Is Lethal to Juvenile Coho, Steelhead, and Chinook Salmonids, But Not Congeneric Sockeye

(Citation: French, B. L., D. H. Baldwin, J. Cameron, J. Prat, K. King, J. W. Davis, J. K. McIntyre & N. L. Scholz (2022). Urban roadway runoff is lethal to juvenile coho, steelhead, and Chinook salmonids, but not congeneric sockeye. Environmental Science & Technology Letters. In Press. DOI: 10.1021/acs.estlett.2c00467)